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Aile filmleri Erotik film izle Erotik Erotik film Erotik Bicaps Film izle Erotik Film izle Vizyon film izle Erotik +18 Erotik Erotik film izle Erotik film Erotik film izle The Filter Bubble

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Follow the Filter Bubble

Filter bubbles, meet Upworthy


/ March 26th, 2012 /

Here’s the challenge: as more and more people discover news and content through Facebook-like personalized feeds, the stuff that really matters falls out of the picture. In the Darwinian environment of the hyper-relevant news feed, content about issues like homelessness or climate change can’t compete with goofy viral videos, celebrity news, and kittens. The public sphere falls out of view. And that matters, because while we can lose sight of our common problems, they don’t lose sight of us.

That problem was one of the main reasons I wrote The Filter Bubble. And today, I’m launching Upworthy, a new website I’ve co-founded with Peter Koechley (formerly of The Onion), to try to do something about it. Every day, we’ll be searching the Internet for the best online content that’s highly shareable and clickable and actually important. Hopefully, we can help bring attention and focus to stuff that really matters in a viral format that can reach millions.

Although the site launches today, we’ve been experimenting with how to super-charge content about stuff that matters for a while. And the cool thing about this stuff is that when you do it right, you can reach far beyond like-minded groups. For example, this inspiring video about gay marriage that we helped draw attention to at MoveOn got seen by over a million people who are against gay marriage. So there’s real bubble-popping potential here.

Check it out, and tell me what you think on Twitter at @elipariser. It’s really exciting, after spending a while researching and thinking about this problem, to take a stab at doing something about it.


Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee weighs in: “There’s danger in the filter bubble”


/ June 16th, 2011 /

In 1989, computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee (now Sir Tim Berners-Lee) invented the World Wide Web. Since then, he’s been an advocate for his creation, preaching the gospel of openness against some of the encroaching forces. (This recent Scientific American article is especially worth reading.)

Recently, an attendee at an Internet Society conference in New York asked him about the filter bubble. Here’s a (slightly cleaned up) transcript of how he responded — emphasis mine.

The filter bubble phenomenon, I think that noun is applied to the idea that a search engine can get to know you and so it can get to know the source of things it thinks you’re interested in. You will end up in a bubble because you will reward the search engine — you will go to the search engine — it feeds you things which you’re excited about and happy about and it won’t feed you things which get you thinking.

. . . As a result, you end up being dedicated to your tribe. You will never understand as a Yankee why the Red Sox were so ‘cachuffed’ to beat you a couple of years ago. As an Israeli you will never understand why you’re upsetting the Palestinian people. So, there’s danger in the filter bubble… Once you’re bracketed as somebody who buys pretty expensive stuff, the web won’t show you the cheap stuff and so you wont believe that the cheap stuff exists. You’ll have a twisted view of the world.

So I think that’s a really interesting thing. Somebody mentioned the Web Science Trust. [This] discussion is very much what I call a web science issue, if you look at this sort of thing you really have to look at humanity connected as a very large system and you have to use a lot of different… you have to use sociology, psychology, you have to use economics and you have to use mathematics as well as computer science to figure out the web and figure out what the implications of this will be.

(The video is here, around minute 31.)

Pretty cool.


Algorithmic dating: OKCupid’s 10 most divisive questions


/ May 12th, 2011 /

As The Filter Bubble describes, OKCupid takes the logic of Google personalized search and applies it to the search for love (or, at minimum, sex). A friend there was kind enough to send me the list of the 10 questions that most evenly divide OKCupid users into groups — a key part of the personalization process. (This isn’t necessarily the order in which viewers see them.)

They’re pretty intense — especially the last, which is a doozy. But when it comes to increasing the match rate, they seem to work. Here they are.

1. What’s your deal with harder drugs (not marijuana)?

  • I do drugs regularly.
  • I do drugs occasionally.
  • I’ve done drugs in the past, but no longer.
  • I never do drugs.

2. How often do you keep your promises?

  • My word is my bond.  No exceptions.
  • Whenever possible
  • Usually
  • When convenient

3. Do you take prevention of STD transmission seriously (making sure your partner has been tested, using protection, being upfront if you’re at risk, etc.)?

  • Yes
  • No

4. If you were in a serious relationship and you learned that your partner cheated on you one drunken night, could you forgive him/her?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Maybe
  • I don’t believe in monogamy

5. Is it ever ok for a man to hit a woman?

  • Yes
  • Only in self-defense.
  • No

6. To you, is abortion an option in case of an unwanted accidental pregnancy?

  • Yes
  • No

7. Are you looking for a partner to have children with?

  • Yes
  • No

8. Is homosexuality a sin?

  • Yes
  • No

9. Does smoking disgust you?

  • Yes
  • No

10. You have just discovered that your eight year old daughter has been raped. The most important thing to do now is….

  • Punish the violator, legally or otherwise
  • Comfort the child
  • Get past this as quickly as possible
  • Handle this quietly

 


Amazon’s personalized recommendation service has a sense of humor.


/ May 9th, 2011 /


Personalization News Roundup: 4/30


/ April 30th, 2011 /

Top filtery goodness of the last few days:


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