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Your Facebook Edgerank exposed


/ August 18th, 2011 /

To you, that is.

Jeremy Keeshin over at thekeesh.com got curious about Facebook’s Edgerank, the algorithm used to determine which friends you interact with – and so appear most often on your news feed.

In the process he wrote a nifty little script that lets you see your own personal friend ranking.

As Jeremy writes, the results shouldn’t be too surprising, but may be embarrassing. I’d also add that they are a bit off. For example, there are two people in my top ten who I almost never interact with. I’m assuming Facebook has them high in my Edgerank because they recently posted vacation pictures that I scrolled through – so, yes, I clicked on a lot of their pages recently, but that’s an anomaly. Should Facebook infer that they are good friends?

Try it out yourself and let us know if Facebook’s results are on or off the mark for you.


 


3 Responses to “Your Facebook Edgerank exposed”

  1. Rose says:

    I ran this and my Facebook friend rankings were all over the place. And with many of my really good friends, I don’t interact with them on Facebook, and so Facebook cuts them out of my news feed.

    It’s terrible and frustrating that Facebook tries to make these assumptions.

  2. john says:

    Yeah really shouldn’t users be allowed to choose who their friends are, who they want to see more of, et cetra. Facebook’s recent changes are in attempt to compete with google plus and twitter, and to create a more twitter like atmoposhere, which means short “updates”, the shorter the better(they discourage longer posts by creating one line opposed to paragraph like spaces before) because it means higher use of keywords and thus more targerted advertising.
    I also don’t like the emphasis on updates in the first place, the whole point of facebook was to connect with friends, leaves messages on their page, et cetra. Now it’s basically reduced to “liking” or leaving a comment, just like twitter.
    The point is that Edgerank isn’t a very useful feature because it has little value to it’s users.

  3. flick says:

    Ha ha. I had a chinese phrase in my list, seems odd. Thanks for posting this.

    Obviously people you click a lot are more important than people you actually interact with in meaningful ways – advertisers want to know what you compulsively click on, not with whom you discuss Kierkegaard.

    -Flick

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